The power of animation lies in the possibilities it holds.  When producing an animation you are not confined by the concrete walls of reality: animation gives you the power to create something creative, engaging and highly effective.  For this reason it makes an astonishingly powerful educational tool.

The Global Health Media Project, supported by various NGO’s and working together with internationally acclaimed animator Yoni Goodman, has produced two animated shorts which are changing and saving lives on a daily basis.  The Story of Cholera (2011) and The Story of Ebola (2014) educate both health workers and ordinary people living in poorer countries about the two deadly diseases.

Deborah van Dyke, founder of the Global Health Media Project, realized the potential of using video to educate health workers in the developing world when, on a trip to South Sudan with Doctors without Borders, she saw health workers struggling to resuscitate a newborn.   Deeply affected by the experience, Deborah conceived the idea of using video to teach health workers basic but life-saving skills.

Animation is enormously powerful in providing healthcare education in developing countries for several reasons:

  1. It visually demonstrates facts, processes and techniques in an easy to understand way.
  2. It is a highly engaging medium and this is particularly significant since UNICEF’s S. Michiels notes that ‘one of the big issues with health comms is that they are seldom appealing to our audiences.’ The Story of… videos are appealing because they are not purely didactic: they tell a story that resonates with their target audience.   Their visual nature itself is also appealing since as Bruno Kenne of Laboel, a Cameroonian NGO notes, ‘Health workers… do not have enough time to read the documents we give to them, but were more attentive to video.’
  3. The story can easily be told in different languages as all that needs to happen is for the voiceover to be changed.
  4. The videos are able to reach huge numbers of people all around the world at very little cost. They are shared online and for areas without internet access TV and radio broadcasts, mobile cinemas and make shift classrooms mean that everyone is able to watch them.

The success of both films is entirely irrefutable.  They have empowered whole communities by providing them with the knowledge necessary to save lives.  The Story of Cholera has been narrated in 27 languages and has been shown in almost every country in the world.   Red Cross volunteers Garber Joseph and Daniel James summed up the impact of the videos perfectly when they said they had ‘reached the unreachable’ in Sierra Leone.  Indeed, in Sierra Leone showing The Story of Cholera led to a 28% increase in people knowing how to make water safe.

Animation provides a medium by which life-saving lessons can be taught to those in the most deprived and hard-to-reach areas of the world.  Moreover, not only are animated films reaching these people but they are making a huge difference to individuals’ lives every single day as a result of the unique benefits of animation.

To read more about the wonderful work of the Global Health Media Project click here.

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It is no secret the there is a huge gender imbalance within the animation industry.  Only 20% of animation creatives are women*.  This is only a 4% increase on 2006’s figures.  Even more worryingly, 60% of animation students are women which means there is a huge drop-off between those women training as animators and those who go on to hold jobs in the industry.  This suggests that the issue lies not in inspiring women to become animators, but in encouraging them to overcome the struggles they face in forging a career in the male-dominated world of animation.  There can be no denying the difficulties women face in the industry.  These difficulties are evident in the fact that only 10% of producers/directors are women and in the last 15 years there have only been two solo women directors of US produced animated features.  These figures irrefutably suggest that women want to become animators, but are prevented from rising up the ranks.

However, there are signs that things are changing.  The theme of this year’s Annecy Festival was ‘honouring women’. As part of this, the daily screening intros celebrated the work of female animation creatives who led the way in the industry but are often glossed over by history.  Indeed, Carrie Tupper recently attempted to compile a thorough history of women in animation but found her search thwarted by a lack of information.  However, she did reveal significant snippets about the women who have shaped the industry and their under-recognition.  For instance, she observed that Lillian Friedman was only credited for six of the eleven titles she worked on at Fleischler Studios.  She also noted how women such as Sylvia Moberly-Holland, who was responsible for Fantasia‘s fairy sequence, were made redundant at the end of WW2 when the men returned.  By bringing these inspirational women to the fore Annecy has effectively honoured them whilst also reminding people of the inherent sexism that has been present in the animation industry for the past century and so implicitly encouraging aspiring female animators to stand up and be counted.

Annecy also placed the newly rejuvenated Women in Animation group at the forefront of proceedings.  This decision, along with the growth of the group itself indicates the industry’s awareness of its own sexism and shows that there is an increasing desire for change brewing.  Women in Animation  was relaunched in October 2013 by Margaret Dean, director of production for Mattel’s Playground Productions, and Kirsty Scanlan, Vice President, Business Development for Technicolor Digital Productions’ Animation.  In this time, the group has grown from 120 members in 2013 to 1020 members at the last count with chapters all over the world.  This rise in membership clearly  demonstrates how women themselves are ready to step up and battle sexism.  To help the next generation of female animation creatives, WIA launched a successful mentoring scheme which aims to ’empower, educate and support’ women in animation which will be expanded this Autumn as it enters its second year.

The work of WIA and the increasing support for the movement suggests that things are changing in the industry.  Margaret Dean observed that ‘there has been very little work done to intentionally change the status quo’ but it seems that now she is taking action herself, alongside 1000 other women and with the support of the animation community.  Encouraging facts such as that winners of the 2012 and 2013 Oscar for Best Animated Feature, Brave and Frozen respectively, were both co-directed by women, are further signs that the industry is changing.  There is still a long way to go but hopefully the WIA’s aim of a 50:50 gender split in animation by 2025 will become a reality.

*Figures are based on Studios in California but are believed to be indicative of the International situation

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What were you doing at fifteen? Probably, like us, not very much and definitely nothing of any particular significance. However, one girl breaking away from the teenage tradition of apathy is Emmie Thompson.

This week we’ve been lucky enough to have wonderful young animator Emmie in the office to help her develop her skills.

Emmie Thompson self-portrait

Just a little self portrait she penned in a couple of minutes!

At the tender age of just fifteen Emmie, who is in Year 10 at St Anthony’s Academy in Sunderland, has already won several awards for her animations before she has even done her GCSE’s… In October 2014, together with her younger sister Lilly, she won the Young Filmmaker’s award in the U14 category at the Berwick Film and Media Festival. The girls were overjoyed with their victory, particularly since they won £250 prize money to put towards their next project and help them develop their skills. The award winning film, Mitchell Goldfield, follows the world’s unluckiest individual as he weathers the storm of a pretty terrible day. Although the film is humorous and light hearted, it is also a gentle reminder that we all face little adversities in our day to day life but that like Mitchell, we just have to keep going.

In November 2014, Emmie was only one of 20 pupils in the UK who were selected to have their animations included in an e-safety film created by the Well Versed project. As a reward for her outstanding work, Emmie visited the Google headquarters and YouTube Studios for a guided tour. After talking to her about this, I can confirm that the rumours are true: Google offices have slides, sleeping pods and free food. We’re still hoping that one day our office will be like that….

Quick Q&A:

Which animatons inspire you? Adventure Time, Gravity Falls, Bravest Warrior

If you were a cartoon character, who would you be? Flynn from Adventure Time

Favourite animated film? Coraline

What sparked your interest in animation: I’ve always loved drawing and watching animated films so the step from drawing to producing my own animations felt pretty natural.

What would your super power be? Flying!

And finally… Your fancy dress costume of choice? Definitely a panda, with full face make up.

Emmie has been working on some exciting top secret things for us this week that we can’t wait to share with you.  We’re pretty flabbergasted by the quality of animation Emmie is producing aged only 15 and we wish her all the best for the future!

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Its official animation has overtaken Action as the UK’s favorite film genre for the first time EVER! Figures released by the British Film Institute reveal that animated films generated £247m in 2013 – a £100m increase on the previous year. Despite only 33 animated films being released last year, compared with 153 comedies, they still dominated representing more than 20% of the total UK box office. It seems animated films such as Frozen, Despicable Me and The Croods are attracting crowds of eager film goers through the cinema doors, with all three featuring in this years box office top ten. The success of animated films has been attributed to the fact that seven to 24 year olds represent the largest majority of cinema-goers, with 47% of cinema admission in 2013 coming from this demographic.

 

Chairman of Animation UK Oliver Hyatt, seemed positive about the future of the animated genre stating, “animated films are becoming more sophisticated and appealing to a broader audience. There is no longer the feeling that they are just for a young audience and adults don’t feel strange going to see them any more. I would say that within the film industry, animation has been playing catch-up for years but the medium is maturing quite fast and there’s more of these films, creating more competition, which has been good for driving up the quality of the genre.” He went on to express his excitement that there is now a “focus on making these family-oriented animated films in this country as well,” and hinted that “in the next couple of years there is some high-profile talent voicing UK animations. Hopefully, we won’t just be watching animation, we’ll be making these high-quality animated films ourselves.”

In total UK box office revenues exceeded £1bn for the third year in succession. Although the success of British films such as Fast and Furious 6, Les Misérables and Philomena meant UK films generated $4.1bn (£2.4bn) worldwide 11% of the global box office this was still a decrease from 2012 when Bond film Skyfall generated $5.3bn.

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Recent changes to airline rules mean the use of electronic devices during take-off, landing and taxiing is now permitted on some flights, as long as the device is in flight safe mode. Airbus’ recent announcement suggests that soon not only will you be able to use your phone off aeroplane mode and during take-off, landing and taxiing but for the duration of the flight.

 The A330Neo is the latest offering from Airbus in attempts to rival Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner, and acts as an upgrade for the twin-aisle, 250-300 seat A330. Boasting 25% lower capital costs than its Boeing rival it will have improved aerodynamics such as new wing tips and an increased wingspan. The new model will reduce fuel consumption by 14% thanks to the Rolls-Royce Trent 7000 engine and will boast an increased range of up to 400 nautical miles as well as room for up to 10 extra seats. 

The plane is expected to reach airlines in 2017, which is a relatively quick period of time from announcement to launch. Features planned for the plane include; a ‘fourth generation’ in-flight entertainment system which can show 3D films and ‘full connectivity’ – which promises wifi, HD video and mobile telephony all available while the plane is in the air. 

Airbus

 The only thing which remains unclear is exactly how much airlines are likely to charge us for these increased privileges, but we’re betting it wont be cheap!

 

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The ALS ice bucket challenge has taken social media by storm with numerous celebrities getting involved including David Beckham, Ronaldo, Iggy Azalea and Kate Upton. It seems that now even our animated friends are getting involved with the stars of Penguins of Madagascar and Homer Simpson taking part. The Ice Challenge involves the participant nominating their friends before being doused in Ice Cold Water and making a donation to ALS research.  According to the New York times, as of Monday the challenge has already helped raise 13 million for the ALS association.  Madagascar’s penguins were challenge by DreamWorks Animation Chief Jeffery Kratzenberg and issued their own challenges to illuminations Minions, Emmett from LB’s the LEGO movie and Sid from Ice Age!

Of course being penguins used to icy temperatures its safe to assume that Skipper and his crew will have an advantage over other participants!

Check out their video below: 

FOX’s Homer Simpson also took part nominating neighbour Flanders, drinking buddy Lenny and Donald Trump. Homer tries to take an easy route out of the challenge pouring only a small glass of ice water over himself, but in true Simpsons style the challenge is then stepped up a level by Homer’s mischievous son Bart. From a helicopter above Bart then drops some penguins, a polar bear, ice hockey players, a yeti and an ice cream truck on his unsuspecting father!

Check it out below: 

What is ALS?

Although the craze has raised huge amounts of money for the ALS foundation many people are still unsure of what it actually is. ALS stands for Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis it is a progressive neuro-degenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Motor neurons reach from the brain to the spinal cord and from the spinal cord to the muscles throughout the body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in ALS eventually lead to the patients death. It is estimated that ALS is responsible for nearly two deaths per hundred thousand population annually.

For more information or to donate to this worthy cause visit the ALS association web page here:

http://alsa.pub30.convio.net/

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Earlier this month we featured a blog which outlined the Creative Emmy Award nominee’s related to animation. The creative Emmy’s award ceremony took place on Saturday August 16th at the Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles. The creative awards are dedicated to the behind the scenes team who work tirelessly to ensure the successful production of our favourite television shows. Often overlooked by those who watch the programmes this night celebrates the tiresome work of the people behind the scenes. So lets refresh our memories of the categories related to animation and find out the all important details of who won!

Outstanding Animated Program

  • Archer
  • Bob’s Burgers
  • Futurama
  • South Park
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Manhattan Project

And the winner is: BOB’S BURGERS – The FOX show beat off tough competition to win for the episode “Mazel Tina,” written by Holly Schlesinger and directed by Brian LoSchiavo.

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 Outstanding Short-Format Animated Program

  • Adventure Time
  • Disney’s Mickey Mouse
  • Disney’s Phineas and Ferb
  • Regular Show
  • Robot Chicken

And the winner is: MICKEY MOUSEEveryone’s favourite mouse took the award for the episode “‘O Sole Minnie.”

 

Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance

  • Chris Diamantapolous as Mickey Mouse. ‘Disneys Mickey Mouse’
  • Stephen Full as Stan. ‘Dog with a Blog’
  • Seth MacFarlane as Peter Griffin, Stewie Griffin, Glenn Quagmire. ‘Family Guy’
  • Maurice LaMarche as Calculon and Morbo. ‘Futurama’
  • Seth Green as various characters, ‘Robot Chicken’
  • Harry Shearer as Kent Broc, Mr Burns & Smithers ‘The Simpsons’

And the winner is: HARRY SHEARER ‘THE SIMPSONS‘ – Bagging his first ever Emmy Harry finally got rewarded for his extraordinary talent voicing four different characters on the episode ‘Four Regretting’s and a funeral.” Shearer provided the voice for news anchor Kent Brockman, Young and old versions of the evil billionaire Mr Burns and his ever present servant Smithers. 

Outstanding Special And Visual Effects

  • Almost Human: “Pilot” • FOX
  • COSMOS: A SpaceTime Odyssey: The Immortals” • FOX/NatGeo
  • Game Of Thrones: “The Children” • HBO
  • The 100: “We Are Grounders, Part 2• CW
  • Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D: “T.A.H.I.T.I.” • ABC

And the winner is: GAME OF THRONES the hugely successful tv programme based on George RR Martin’s a song of Ice and Fire book series scooped the award for outstanding special and visual effects on their episode, ‘The Children.’

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Outstanding Special And Visual Effects In A Supporting Role

  • Black Sails: “I.” • Starz
  • Da Vinci’s Demons: “The Sins of Daedalus” • Starz
  • Hawaii Five-0: “Ho’onani Makuakane” • CBS
  • Mob City: “A Guy Walks Into a Bar” • TNT
  • Vikings: “Invasion” • HISTORY
  • The Walking Dead: “30 Days Without An Accident” • AMC

And the winner is: BLACK SAILS – The Starz original series sailed away with the award for outstanding special and visual effects in a supporting role.

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 The Award ceremony will air on Sunday the 24th August at 8pm. Congratulations to all this years winners!! 

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This week saw ‘How to Train your Dragon 2” gross a staggering $500million at the global box office, cementing itself as the most successful animated venture of 2014 so far. The sequel to the widely popular, ‘How to Train your Dragon’ surpassed Rio 2’s $494.1 million takings and it is still showing in cinemas, having only opened in Italy this weekend. With the animated genre becoming ever more popular and successful we’ve decided to take a look back at the most successful animated films of all time.

10.

Shrek Forever After (2010) $752.600,867

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This fourth instalment in the ever popular Shrek franchise sees Shrek come up against Rumplestilskin who tricks him into erasing himself from existence. Despite receiving mixed reviews from critics, the film remained number one in the US and Canada for three consecutive weeks, and with its staggering global takings of over 750 million places itself firmly as number 10 on our list

9.

Shrek the Third (2007) $798,958,162

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At number nine we once again find our favourite green ogre and friends. When his father in law suddenly dies, Shrek is faced with the daunting task of ruling far far away. Horrified at the thought of having to be king Shrek goes of in search of another heir. Similar to ‘Shrek Forever After’ the film received mixed reviews from critics but went on to gross over 790 million dollars making it a commercial success.

8.

Ice Age; Continental Drift (2012) $877,244,782

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The fourth instalment in the Ice Age franchise, Ice Age; Continental Drift was the highest grossing film of 2012. The film received mixed reviews as some critics felt it simply recycled plot lines from the previous films. Many people seemed to disagree as the film was still able to gross over 850 million and place itself as the 8th most popular animated film of all time.

7.

Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (2009) $886,686,817

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Continuing the trend of dominating sequels, taking the number 7 spot is the third Ice Age film , ‘Dawn of the Dinosaurs.’ Sid is kidnapped by a tyrannosaurs rex, Ellie and Manny are expecting their first child and Dieago fears he is losing his predatory tiger nature. Similar to the other sequel films it was given mixed reviews by critics but it appears that cinema-goers remain loyal to their favourite franchises and this is enough to get them buying tickets, judging by the global takings for this film.

6.

Shrek 2 (2004) $919,838,758

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Shrek dominates the top 10 with yet another sequel from the franchise appearing. Shrek 2 was the highest grossing film of 2004 and received positive reviews from critics. Follow up to the original ‘Shrek’ in 2001 it is Dreamworks most successful film to date.

5.

Finding Nemo (2003) $936,743, 261

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At the halfway point of our list we find the academy award winning, ‘Finding Nemo’. When over-protective clownfish Marlin’s young son Nemo is kidnapped he must embark on a journey throughout the ocean to rescue him. His journey takes him all the way to Sydney and he makes a new friend along the way, a forgetful and ever chatty Regal Tang named Dory. Finding Nemo was the most popular selling DVD of all time with over 40 million copies sold worldwide. A spin-off film named ‘Finding Dory’ is set to be released in 2015 and based on the runaway success of Finding Nemo expectations will be high.

4.

Despicable Me 2 (2013) $970,761,885

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The follow up to the widely successful ‘Despicable Me’ about an evil villain named Gru, Dispicabele Me 2 the sees the return of Gru, his girls and his trusted minions. In an interesting twist on the first film Gru find himself trying to save rather than destroy the world after being recruited by the anti-villain league.

3.

The Lion King (1994) $987,483,777

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The oldest film included on the list and the highest grossing hand-drawn animation of all time, ‘The Lion King’ claims the number three spot. A defining feature in many of our childhoods the classic tale also gained academy awards for achievement in music. It temporarily dropped down the list but after its 3D re-release it proved it is still a firm family favourite being surpassed only by Toy Story 3 and Frozen.

2.

Toy Story 3 (2010) $1,063,171,91

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Released 15 years after the original Toy Story 3 was highly anticipated by a generation and won awards for Best Original Song and Best Animated Feature. The plot focuses on the toys and their uncertain fate as the now 17 year old Andy prepares to leave for university. Toy Story 3 held the record for most successful animated release until 2013 when it was overtaken by Disney’s musical offering Frozen.

1.

Frozen (2013) $1,274,219,009 

sojo.net

This multi award winning offering from Disney broke all kinds of records to take the number one spot as the most successful animated film of all time. The original story turns the traditional Disney archetype on its head, with the female leads empowering themselves and no longer relying on the ‘male hero’ to rescue them. With catchy songs and loveable characters Frozen dominated the award ceremonies winning the Golden Globe for, ‘Best Animated Feature Film’, two Academy Awards for ‘Best Animated Feature and ‘Best Original Song’ for ‘Let it Go,’ the BAFTA award for ‘Best Animated Film,’ five Annie Awards including Best Animated feature and two Critics Choice Awards for ‘Best Animated feature’ and ‘Best Original Song.’

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After the tragic passing of comedy actor Robin Williams on Monday night we decided that it would only be fitting to post a tribute to such a talented actor who holds a particular significance within the animated genre. Not only a successful figure in comedy and acting, Williams infectious portrayal of the Genie in the lamp revolutionised the way we hear animated voice overs today.

www.digitalspy.co.uk

When many of us hear the name Robin William’s are minds are flooded with images of his various famous character roles such as Mrs Doubt fire, Patch Adams and indeed the genie from Disney’s animated move Aladdin.

 In his portrayal of the mischievous blue genie Williams diverged from the typical script dictated voice over style, unknowingly changing voice acting forever. Ad- libbing and improvising on what was written, he breathed new life into not only the genie but the art of voice animation. Thanks to his natural comedic timing and instinctive flair actors are now free to bring their own skill and interpretation to their roles enabling them to better bring their characters to life.

Although Robin was not the first famous face to lend his voice to animation, ‘Aladdin’ is widely regarded as the first film to base its marketing on the strength of having a famous actor voicing a character. Since William’s epic portrayal of the genie (where he mimicked the voices of Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jack Nicholson and Robert De Niro among others), celebrity A-listers have flocked towards the animated genre with big names such as Angelina Jolie, Eddie Murphy and Tom Hanks all giving their voices to animated characters.

 Williams reportedly accepted the film role on the condition that his voice was used only in the film and not for public promotion. He agreed to work for actors scale (minimum wage) mainly so that his children could see him in a Disney film. Disney inadvertently broke this contract causing a feud between the company and Williams with Disney apparently presenting Robin with a one million dollar Picas so by way of an apology.

 Disney released a heartfelt tribute to the actor with CEO and Chairman Robert Iger stating, ‘we’re deeply saddened by the loss of Robin Williams, a wonderfully gifted man who touched our hearts and never failed to make us laugh. An incredible actor and a comedic genius, Robin will always be remembered for bringing some of the world’s favourite characters to life…He was a true Disney Legend, a beloved member of our family, and he will be sorely missed. We join Robin’s friends and fans everywhere in mourning, and offer our thoughts and condolences to his family during this difficult time.’

The statement was released alongside the touching graphic (pictured below) created by Eric Goldberg who worked with Robin as the supervising animator on ‘Aladdin’.

Disney/Eric Goldberg

Williams love of voice acting did not end with Aladdin and he went on to voice parts in both ‘Happy feet’ and ‘Robots.’ A hugely talented actor who spread joy and laughter to thousands of people across the world, he will be missed by many and his contribution to the animated genre will not be forgotten. Our condolences are with his family and friends at this sad time.

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 The time has come again for the annual Emmy Awards! The 2014 Awards will be presented in a Creative Arts set on August 16th at the Nokia Theatre at L.A. Live. While the Primetime Emmys will be presented Aug. 25 also at the Nokia Theatre. Surprisingly, The Simpsons’ have not been nominated for ‘Outstanding Animated Program’ for the first time since 1994.

The Animated and Visual Effects related Nominees are as follows

Outstanding Animated Program :

  • Archer
  • Bob’s Burgers
  • Futurama
  • South Park
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Manhattan Project

Outstanding Short-Format Animated Program

  • Adventure Time
  • Disney’s Mickey Mouse
  • Disney’s Phineas and Ferb
  • Regular Show
  • Robot Chicken

Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance

  • Chris Diamantapolous as Mickey Mouse. ‘Disneys Mickey Mouse’
  • Stephen Full as Stan. ‘Dog with a Blog’
  • Seth MacFarlane as Peter Griffin, Stewie Griffin, Glenn Quagmire. ‘Family Guy’
  • Maurice LaMarche as Calculon and Morbo. ‘Futurama’
  • Seth Green as various characters, ‘Robot Chicken’
  • Harry Shearer as Kent Broc, ‘The Simpsons’

Outstanding Special And Visual Effects

  • Almost Human: “Pilot” • FOX
  • COSMOS: A SpaceTime Odyssey: The Immortals” • FOX/NatGeo
  • Game Of Thrones: “The Children” • HBO
  • The 100: “We Are Grounders, Part 2• CW
  • Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D: “T.A.H.I.T.I.” • ABC

 

Outstanding Special And Visual Effects In A Supporting Role

  • Black Sails: “I.” • Starz
  • Da Vinci’s Demons: “The Sins of Daedalus” • Starz
  • Hawaii Five-0: “Ho’onani Makuakane” • CBS
  • Mob City: “A Guy Walks Into a Bar” • TNT
  • Vikings: “Invasion” • HISTORY
  • The Walking Dead: “30 Days Without An Accident” • AMC


Congratulations to all Nominee’s! It looks like ‘Robot Chicken’ and ‘Futurama’ are this years top nominees in the animated sector scoring themselves two nominations each. Who do you think will win in each category? Make your predictions and we will post an update when winners are announced.

 

 

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